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While You Were Trying to Sleep

Author: Glenn Shepard
Date: January 21, 2014
Category: Inspiration
 

 

     
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Dear Glenn,   

I have an employee that claims I'm always disciplining her. She claims I treat her like a child that's always getting scolded and never discipline my other employees. But Glenn, I don't have to discipline my others. They all do their jobs.  I've done just as you say and am firm, fair, and consistent.  What do I tell this woman?

Kathy in New Hampshire

 

Dear Kathy,

When she behaves like a mature, responsible adult, she will be treated accordingly. When she behaves like a child, she will also be treated accordingly. The choice is hers.

    Thanks for your question.

Glenn in Nashville, TN

Click here to submit a question. If yours is selected, you'll win your choice of the "I'm the Boss, Not the Babysitter" or "Work Is Not for Sissies"  coffee mug.
 

If your best ideas come while you're sleeping, you're in good company.

In 1905, Elias Howe couldn’t get the needle to work in his new invention. One night he dreamed he was building it for a savage king who gave him 24 hours to succeed.

 

He failed.

 

As soldiers were taking him to be executed, he noticed theirs spears were pierced near the head. He realized this was the solution and awoke from the dream at 4:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., he had the needle threaded and introduced his new invention - the modern sewing machine.

In 1953, Dr. James Watson dreamed about two snakes intertwined with their heads at opposite ends. That led to the discovery of the structure of DNA.

In 1964, a young musician woke up with a tune in his head and played it on his piano. He assumed he’d heard it before, but eventually realized he had written it while he was sleeping. His name was Paul McCartney, and the song was "Yesterday".

That same year, a young golfer couldn’t figure out why his game was off. After seeing himself holding the club differently in a dream, he tried it and it worked. His name was Jack Nicklaus.

In 1981, a young man dreamed about a robot dragging itself across the floor with a knife. His name was James Cameron, and that dream turned into “The Terminator”. The idea for “Avatar” also came to him in a dream.

In 1984, a passenger fell asleep on a plane and dreamed about a woman who held a writer prisoner. His name was Stephen King, and he turned that dream into the bestselling book “Misery”.

In 2009, an stay-at-home-mom dreamed of “two people in kind of a little circular meadow with really bright sunlight". Her name was Stephenie Meyer, and she turned that dream into the bestselling book “Twilight”.

If you find yourself waking up at night with good ideas, write them down. I keep a yellow legal pad and lighted pen (the Nite-Writer II) on the bedside table.

You might just be the next person to change the world while you were sleeping.
 

 

To Your Success,

Glenn Shepard

 

 

 

 

P.S. As we enter our 10th year of this newsletter, I should also add that the title "Work Is Not for Sissies" came to me in a dream, as have many of the articles and quotes.

 
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