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Walking Away is Not the Same as Being a Quitter

 

Author:   Glenn Shepard
Date:   March 18, 2014
Category:   Careers & Management

 

   
 
   

 

 
San Marcos, TX March 19
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Dear Glenn,   

The red wax seal would definitely get my attention, but it seems like a feminine touch. Do you recommend this for men as well?

Janene in Omaha, NE 

 

Dear Janene,

Absolutely. Wax seals were originally used to verify that important documents were unopened, such as a king's orders to a military leader during times of war.

     We use them in my business and get as much positive feedback from men as women.

   Thanks for your question.

Glenn in Nashville, TN

 
 
Click here to submit a question. If yours is selected, you'll win your choice of the "I'm the Boss, Not the Babysitter" or "Work Is Not for Sissies"  coffee mug.

The oldest cliché in self-improvement is that quitters never win and winners never quit.

 

But there are times that we find ourselves in bad situations we can’t change, which leaves two choices:

 

1. Accept things as they are

2. Leave

 

There are certainly some bad situations that people stay in out of a sense of obligation, and this isn’t a bad thing. Serving something greater than yourself is generally a sign of maturity, responsibility, and unselfishness.

 

A common example is a not-so-happy couple that stays married and remains civil to each other in order to provide a stable home for their kids. (Not to confuse an unhappy marriage with one that’s  destructive and dangerous.)

 

But too many people stay in bad situations they have no obligation to stay in and try to rationalize it by sounding noble.

 

Think about how many people you’ve known who tried to justify wasting years of their lives in dead end jobs by saying they’re not quitters.

 

People constantly tell me how they dislike their jobs and would like to make a change. When I ask why they don't, they give a list of reasons why they “can’t”.

 

But they’re all just excuses.

 

It’s a sad reality of human nature that it’s easier for people to maintain the status quo – no matter how much they dislike it – than to make a change.

 

Social workers who try to get battered women out of deadly situations have a saying that goes, “I know I live in Hell, but at least I know the streets by name”.

 

Your situation may not be that extreme, but staying at a job (or in a career field) you hate is as much of a disservice to your employer as it is to you.

 

If your body is at your present job but your heart and head are somewhere else, your company’s only getting a third of what it’s paying for.

 

Walking away doesn’t always mean you’re a quitter. Sometimes, it means just the opposite.

 

 

To Your Success,

Glenn Shepard

 

 

 

P.S. If you’re in a bad situation, this article is not to encourage you to leave. It’s to encourage you to be honest about why you’re really staying.

 

 

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