Click here if this doesn't display properly on your screen.

 

 

The H.B.U. Principle

 

Author:   Glenn Shepard
Date:   June 3, 2014
Category:   Management

 

   
 
   

 

 
Bowling Green, OH June 10
Cincinnati, OH June 11
Frankfort, KY June 12
Bossier City, LA June 24
Lake Charles, LA June 25
Slidell, LA June 26
 
Click here or call 1-800-538-4595 to reserve seats.

Dear Glenn,

 

I liked the comments from Jamie in Poughkeepsie about the policy they implemented to stop negative talk about people.

    What have others used as a consequence if the policy is broken? I'm pretty certain I know what your response will be, but would appreciate the support since no matter how good someone is at their job, if their attitude is bad, then they aren’t that good.

 

- Cary in Green Bay, WI

 

Dear Cary,

 

This is where the progressive discipline process is ideal. If something happens once, it's an isolated incident.

     Twice and it's a coincidence. Three times, and it's a pattern.

     No matter how minor an isolated incident may be, it's not so minor when it becomes a pattern.

     Thanks for your question.

 

- Glenn in Nashville, TN

 
Click here to submit a question. If yours is selected, you'll win your choice of the "I'm the Boss, Not the Babysitter" or "Work Is Not for Sissies"  coffee mug.

A dentist that attended my seminar at the University of Wisconsin asked how he should handle an employee that gossiped and constantly stirred up the muck.

 

Another dentist that attended the same seminar asked how she should handle an employee that constantly came to work late.

 

My answer to both was, “YOU shouldn’t be the one handling this”.

 

As dentists, they’re the highest paid employees in their businesses. In order to maximum their own incomes and their ability to pay their employees well, they have to make their practices as profitable as possible.

 

This can only be achieved when everyone in the practice focuses on the H.B.U. principle of time management.

 

H.B.U. stands for “The Highest and Best Use" of your time.

 

The highest and best use of the dentists’ time is to be chair side treating patients and generating income, while a Practice Manager handles employee issues.

 

While the dentists could handle employees issues, it’s not what they should be doing.

 

By the same token, the Practice Manager could answer phones and check in patients. But the Director of First Impressions (aka Receptionist) should be the one doing that.

 

No matter what business you’re in, or what your position is, you and your organization will only excel when only everyone is practicing the H.B.U principle .

 

There is a direct correlation between a manager’s willingness to delegate, and their success as a manager. There’s also an inverse relationship between success and micromanaging.

 

Being “hands on” isn’t a bad thing. Micro-Managing is.

 

 

To Your Success,

 

 

Glenn Shepard

 

 

 

P.S. This is why it's sometimes said that the three rules of management are "Delegate, Delegate, Delegate".

 

 

 

Click on this button to comment

on today's column.

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^      ^     ^      ^      ^      ^      ^