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Different Friends May Be Necessary for Self-Actualization

 

Author:   Glenn Shepard
Date:   August  26,  2014
Category:   Motivation
 
   

 

   
Anderson, SC August 27
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Dear Glenn,

 

I have an employee that's emailing derogatory comments about me and other employees to a previous employee.

     They are emailing back and forth during the work day. Both of these people have been angry since I was promoted to be the boss.

     Should I confront her with the emails? Should I fire her?

 

Lisa in Georgia

 

 

Dear Lisa,

 

Don't fire her (yet), but do confront her. Explain that any email sent on a company computer, on company time, can and will be read by you.

   Document that this is a verbal warning and is the first step of a progressive discipline process.

     Thanks for your question.

 

Glenn in Nashville, TN

 
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Letís face it.

 

We all get into ruts from time to time, and feel like thereís no escape from the routine that has become our lives. It can really make life seem like a real monster.

 

So how do we allow ourselves to get into these ruts?

 

The truth is that we're totally to blame for a lack of progress in our lives. We stopped challenging ourselves to learn new things and experiment with different ideas. No matter what, it is a fact that we got comfortable in the rut in which we now sit.

 

So how do we get out?

 

Self-actualization is not something we are born with ó it's something we attain. Self-actualized people just want to be the best they can be every day of their lives.

 

Like everyone else, they have their bad days too, but they seem to happen less often and with quicker rebounds.

 

Itís not a pursuit of perfection that drives a self-actualized individual. They never even want to reach perfection or even believe it exists. After all, if they ever reached a point where further self-improvement was not possible, then they too would be in a rut.

 

The self-actualizers simply keep pushing the bar higher, learning new skills, and fully immersing themselves in everything they do ó while having a ball in the process.

 

Self-actualization can only begin when you start surrounding yourself with people who are wiser and healthier than yourself.

 

It's easy to stay in a rut and cease making progress in life when you and your friends are all in the same boat.

 

But try hanging out with someone that is composing their own music or turning the grapes in their back yard into wine with a contraption they made themselves. These people cannot help but to inspire us to learn something new and become better people in the process.

 

So if youíre stuck in a routine that feels like it will never end, maybe it's time to start looking for some new friends. Self-actualization is a process and it never begins unless you make it happen.

 

 

To Your Success,

 

 

Glenn Shepard

 

 

 

P.S.  This doesn't mean you have to "dump" existing friends that are less-than-positive influences. It simply means that you need to dilute their influence by adding more positive influences in your life.

 

 

 

 

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